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Parent-Child Classes Set for 2015-2016

Parent-Child 15-16 fly

Ashwood will be offering five sessions of Parent-Child classes in 2015-16. These gentle, nurturing classes are for children ages 18 months to three years and their accompanying caregiver, and will be led by longtime teacher Marianne Böckli. Each session lasts for five weeks, and the cost is $150 per session. Ask about discounts when you enroll in more than one session. Register no later than one week prior to a session’s start date.

In our parent-child program, children engage in creative play with simple and natural toys provided as the tools for their imaginations. Those parents not engaged in child-led play may work on a craft project provided by the teacher, help with snack preparation, or discuss a reading on an aspect of parenting or child development.

The morning ends with a walk through the woods on one of our trails, culminating on the playground for time to climb and swing. A goodbye song in a circle completes the morning.

Each week the same flow of activities takes place so that even the youngest children observe the weekly rhythms and begin to participate as part of the larger group.

The Parent-Child program nurtures the whole family (moms, dads, babies, toddlers, and grandparents are all welcome) and provides a bridge from home to school. When ready, children may transition to the mixed-age Early Childhood classroom.

Sparkle! Event and Online Auction

spark logo

Bid for a getaway at Sugarloaf; a windjammer cruise; horseback riding lessons; restaurant meals; a CSA share; bodywork sessions galore; and much, much more. February 28 through March 14, Ashwood Waldorf School is hosting an online auction. The array of offerings includes items for all budgets and tastes. Online bidding is easy and quick.

Ashwood is also hosting a gala event at the Rockport Opera House: Sparkle: Music, Food, and Community, on March 28 at 7:00 p.m. Showcasing music by the
Gawler Family and Friends and a dance performance by Droplet Dance, the evening also features great food, a cash bar by 40 Paper, a silent auction, and a 50/50 raffle.
Tickets for the celebration at the Rockport Opera House are $20 advance online at Bidding Owl or at Ashwood Waldorf School, $25 at the door.

gawlers

Middle School Presents the Pirates of Penzance

By Rachel Sizeler-Fletcher, Grade 7

By Rachel Sizeler-Fletcher, Grade 7

The pirates are coming to Rockport! Ashwood Waldorf School’s middle school will present Gilbert & Sullivan’s swashbuckling comedic operetta, The Pirates of Penzance, at the Rockport Opera House on Thursday, March 19 at 11:00 a.m. and Friday, March 20 at 6:30 p.m. The public is invited. A $10 donation is suggested. Under 16 free.

Adapted for teen voices, this production includes all of the elements for which the Victorian-era theatrical partners W.S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan are so well known.

Startling plot twists, physical comedy, word play, sword play, and more all come together in this classic musical comedy to create a perfect storm of romance, adventure, hilarity, and hijinks.

The Pirates of Penzance includes one of the most famous patter songs in the history of musical theater, “I Am the Very Model of a Modern Major-General,” sung in this production by Isaiah Doble. The show also features Aspen Laurita-Spanglet as the courageous Mabel; Caleb Edwards as Frederic, “the slave of duty;” Ryan Hart as the Pirate Queen; Julian King as the Sergeant of Police; and Kate Kemper as the lovesick and matronly Ruth.

Backed by a 24-member chorus of bumbling constables, sentimental pirates, and feisty maidens, the cast not only upends a few gender stereotypes, but may just give audiences a whole new perspective on what it means to be a teenager. Chorus members include: Jasper Berryman-Moore, Elsa Chandler, Leah Doolen, Sylvan Eichenlaub, Morgan MacDougal, Jacob Mills-Lightner, Eli Moore, Sofia Mott, Ocean Rancourt, Daniel Snider, Yonah Wienges, Michael Frampton, Cullan Hamilton, Isabella LaBranche, Andrew Levitt, Jasper Louden, Frances Ostensen, Anikka Reinwand, Rachel Sizeler-Fletcher, Ella Finger, Tessa Mott, Zaela Newcomb, Kayla Olds, and Christian Ray.

Zoot Student Art Show

zootZoot Coffee on Elm St. in Camden, Maine is hosting an exhibit of artworks by Ashwood Waldorf School students during the months of December and January.

Ashwood’s professional faculty is devoted to challenging and engaging each student through a curriculum that integrates science and mathematics with literature, history, and the arts.

Every Waldorf student can play an instrument, paint, draw, and create handcrafts. However, we are not an art school. Waldorf schools around the world integrate the arts into every subject to bring lessons to life and draw out the children’s inherent capacities. The classroom atmosphere fosters interest, wonder, and enthusiasm.

In kindergarten and the lower grades, children paint with watercolors weekly. Younger children focus on the primary colors; later, they encounter more colors and techniques. They also have regular opportunities to color with crayons and model with beeswax. In the early grades, teachers emphasize the artistic process; as the children mature, the result of their artistic work becomes more important.

In the upper elementary grades, students continue with watercolor painting, and may also work with pastels, draw with pencils and charcoal, and paint in layers. Students paint and draw still-lifes and portraits and depict moods and landscapes. Students work with clay in many settings, integrating the arts into other subject areas.

Form drawing is a unique component of the Waldorf curriculum and has both pedagogical and artistic value. Form drawing in first grade leads to the formation of the letters of the alphabet. As the grades progress, form drawing hones fine-motor skills and hand-eye coordination, which leads to later precision in free hand geometric drawing.

Stop by and feast your eyes!

Dollmaking Workshop

Ashwood Waldorf School is offering an opportunity to create a beautiful, soft doll in time for holiday giving on four Mondays evenings: Nov. 3, 10, 17, and Dec. 2. from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m.

Ashwood’s early-childhood teacher, Beth Lunt, will provide free instruction, and guide participants in purchasing necessary materials.

Call or email to register (by October 20), or with any questions: 207.236.8021 info@ashwoodwaldorf.orgdoll

Parent-Child Classes: Register Now for Fall 2014

Marianne Böckli, Ashwood Waldorf School’s Forest Kindergarten teacher, will lead Ashwood’s Parent-Child classes this fall. Classes will be offered on six Tuesday mornings from 9:00 – 11:00 a.m., beginning October 28. Cost for the six sessions is $150, and you must register by October 21.

Parent-child classes are a gentle and nurturing program for children ages 18 months to three years and their accompanying caregiver.

While children engage in creative play with simple, natural toys, adults may work on a craft project provided by the teacher, help with snack preparation, or discuss parenting or child development. A walk through the woods on one of our trails, time on the playground to climb and swing, and a goodbye song together complete the morning.

Ashwood’s Parent-Child program nurtures the whole family (moms, dads, babies, toddlers, and grandparents are all welcome) and provides a bridge from home to school. When ready, young children may transition to Ashwood’s mixed-age Early Childhood classroom.

Contact Judith Soleil: jsoleil@ashwoodwaldorf.org 207.236.8021

Ashwood Hosts Film Screenings

School’s Out: Lessons from a Forest Kindergarten. Ashwood Waldorf School Hosts Film Screenings

On Sunday, August 10, Ashwood Waldorf School hosts two free showings of the film, School’s Out: Lessons from a Forest Kindergarten. The short film will be presented at the Rockland Public Library at 2:00 p.m., and again at 4:00 p.m. at Ashwood’s early-childhood center at 180 Park St. Childcare will be provided for both screenings.

Ashwood is launching a forest kindergarten program this fall, the first in the Rockport area. The forest kindergarten will offer a full Waldorf early-childhood experience, outdoors. Fall, winter, and spring, in all weathers, children will enjoy seasonal activities, circle time, gardening, forest walks, and creative free play. The Forest Kindergarten movement is growing rapidly in the U.S. after more than 40 years’ success in Europe and Scandinavia.

Both film showings are free. Please RSVP no later than Friday, August 8: 207.236.8021
info@ashwoodwaldorf.org

schools out photo.

New Forest Kindergarten Now Enrolling

Ashwood’s Forest Kindergarten program will offer a full Waldorf kindergarten experience, outdoors. Fall, winter, and spring, in all weathers, children will enjoy seasonal activities, circle time, gardening, forest walks, and creative free play. They will delight in stories around the fire where they prepare their snack and warm their tea. Waldorf early-childhood education integrates art, music, and movement into a structured, play-based curriculum. With small class sizes and dedicated, experienced teachers, Ashwood provides active and creative experiences that nurture an enthusiasm for learning. Veteran teacher and outdoor educator Marianne Bockli will lead the program. Bockli has spent the last five years mentoring Waldorf teachers in China, and brings a rich life experience and deep love of nature to the program. The Forest Kindergarten program will be offered on Wednesdays to children enrolled in Ashwood’s regular Early Childhood program. There will be no additional tuition fees for enrolling in the program. Participants will enjoy the traditional course of activities with their regular teacher and classmates on the other days of the week.

Forest boys

Class 3-4 Trip to Beech Hill. By Class Teacher Robert Kaczor

snowy-owl-landing-quebec

It was a damp, foggy, almost springlike day on Friday, January 17, when the Grade 3-4 class left campus to hike Beech Hill in Rockport.  We had been studying local geography and it was my hope that we would be able to see and sketch some of the islands and mountains the students had been learning about.  It was obvious even before we left campus that the low clouds and thick fog were going to be a hindrance on this endeavor but I decided we would go for it anyway.

Though my plan would certainly need to be modified, the students seemed unperturbed by the conditions.  As we hiked/ran/splashed/trudged up the dirt path to the top of the hill, the students sang, talked, and joked with one another in high spirits.  As we looked out the blueberry fields faded away into the fog and, before us, the path itself seemed to disappear into nothing.

“It looks like we’re walking off the end of the world” one student observed.  I was feeling the same way.  I was determined to find some worthwhile experience from this trip since my original plan for the day was being swallowed by the ubiquitous fog so we took a moment to imagine that we were at the edge of the world.  Then I let the student run to explore the stone Beech Nut “hut.”

In the first local geography block, I start in concentric circles from our immediate surroundings, the classroom, school building, campus, and gradually work to the range of the furthest students’ homes.  Though not very tall or difficult to hike, Beech Hill offers a view of just about that distance and certainly manifest the character of the Camden Hills and Penobscot Bay.  The fog however, was forcing us to focus back in on our immediate surroundings so we explored the grounds of Beech Nut and identified some of the plants and trees that we found; black spruce, blueberries, bayberries, wild rose, etc.

“An owl!” called one student excitedly.  More enthusiastic echoes came from his classmates.  I hurried over to see.  About 50 yards from us, almost our total visibility, perched a large bird with a bright white head.

“A bald eagle perhaps?” I suggested.

“No, it’s turning its head like an owl.” Indeed, it was, and, it had the unmistakable face of an owl.  But what kind of owl?  White face; grey plumage; LARGE body.  We observed it as carefully as we could but it had already assessed us far better.

It decided that our romping around was either going to scare up some critters or convince them to stay in their homes.  With a few wide flaps it took off into the air and circled right over our heads to see if any of us were small enough to carry off; we stayed bunched together.  As it flew directly over us, it was clear to me what we were seeing.  From below the owl was as white as the fog it was carving through.  Had it not already been reported in the area I might not have known that it was – a snowy owl.

It circled above us for a few more silent moments before disappearing into the fog.  I felt my eyes well slightly at such a rare and beautiful sight.  The students also seemed to sense the significance of what we had just seen and began to dance and play and recount the experience to one another.

The rest of our visit to Beech Hill was as stimulating as I had hoped it would be.  We walked the forest paths and identified any and all of the local flora and fauna that we could.  By the time we made it back to the hut for a snack, the sky had finally cleared enough for us to look out and take in Penobscot Bay and the Camden Hills.

Our trip to Beech Hill was not as I imagined it would be.  The paper I brought to make sketches was damp and we didn’t have a lot of time to identify all the geographical features around us, though we named many.  However, the real lesson that I took away from that day, and hope the students did too, was perseverance; we could easily have rescheduled our trip for a nicer day but we stayed committed and were rewarded for it.

“Until one is committed, there is hesitancy, the chance to draw back. Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one elementary truth, the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then Providence moves too. All sorts of things occur to help one that would never otherwise have occurred. A whole stream of events issues from the decision, raising in one’s favor all manner of unforeseen incidents and meetings and material assistance, which no man could have dreamed would have come his way. Whatever you can do, or dream you can do, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Begin it now.”

-William Hutchinson Murray, The Scottish Himalayan Expedition

Fifth Grade Celebrates Deepavali, and Embarks on World Travels

divali

The fifth grade has been busy exploring a wide range of cultures. We learned about Ancient India and Persia in October, and celebrated Deepavali in mid-November with a big, merry crowd of family and friends. In preparation, the class made oil lamps with Susan Junge, and created rangoli, or colored sand paintings, in their geometry class. For the festival, they dressed in silk costumes from India. The class enacted a ceremony for Lakshmi, the goddess of fortune, sang a kirtan to Siva, and performed an Indian village stick dance. Then we ate, drank, chatted, and romped with our families in honor of the lunar New Year. It was very meaningful and poignant to celebrate a ceremony that we first experienced with our dear teacher and colleague, Mrs. Kalmath.

The next day was our first assembly, and the class got to show some of their bookwork, sing a new song, and demonstrate their juggling and plate-spinning skills.

ship

During our geography block, we got into an imaginary clipper ship and sailed from the waters of Greenland down to Cape Cod, then on to Chesapeake Bay, down past the Okefenokee Swamp, around the Everglades, through the West Indies, and on to the bayou in the Gulf of Mexico. We went around Mexico and Central America, then back up the Pacific coast, around Alaska, and into the islands of Northern Canada. I don’t think any of us knew there were so many places where alligators live, nor that there are people on our beautiful planet who don’t ever eat vegetables! We listened to music from different cultures of North America: Quebecois fiddle, Cuban son, Louisiana zydeco, Jamaican reggae… an extraordinary variety of styles. We ended the block up among the Inuit; in the spring, we’ll come home by…balloon!

—Class teacher Lesley Finlayson